Medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS), also known as ‘shin splints’, is a condition characterised by pain and tenderness along the inner edge of the tibia (also known as your shinbone). MTSS is a common injury among athletes and runners, typically seen in sports that involve repetitive stress on the lower leg bones, such as running, jumping, and dancing.

What causes MTSS?

MTSS is caused by repetitive stress on the lower leg bones, particularly the tibia (shinbone). The stress leads to inflammation and irritation of the muscles, tendons, and periosteum (the membrane that covers the bone). The main contributing factors to MTSS include: Read more

What is tennis elbow?

Tennis elbow, also known as lateral epicondylalgia or lateral elbow tendinopathy, is the most common overuse condition affecting the elbow. Despite its name, tennis elbow can affect anyone, not just tennis players, and is prevalent in those engaged in activities involving repetitive forearm and wrist movements. It is estimated that up to 3% of the general population will experience this condition at some point in their lives.1 In this blog, we will explore the leading causes, common signs and symptoms, and management of tennis elbow from a physiotherapist’s perspective.

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Recovering from an ACL injury? Here’s why late-stage rehab is essential in getting you back in the game.

Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are one of the most common knee injuries in the active population. There are both surgical and non-surgical management options following ACL injury with a rehabilitation period recommended with both management pathways. The rehabilitation process is designed to run in phases over 9-12 months and begins early after injury.

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Almost everyone has heard of sciatica. But when we talk about this condition, it can be a bit unclear what it actually is.

The term is often used quite loosely, for example to describe different types of leg pain that aren’t necessarily connected to the sciatic nerve.

There are also some common myths around sciatica, especially regarding diagnosis and treatment.

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Your body does a lot of amazing and powerful things when you’re running, like taking on staggering forces of approximately 250% of your body weight. There’s also a greater demand for balance with only one foot ever in contact with the ground at any time, with many muscles working hard to keep you moving through each stride with power, control and stability. And the hard work doesn’t stop with your feet or legs – the impact of running moves up the joints of the body (called the kinetic chain) to the pelvis, chest, spine, arms, shoulders and head, too. 

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Being in pain can cause significant disturbances to our sleep, leaving us restless, uncomfortable and frustrated throughout the night. It’s an awful Catch 22, given that having a good nights’ sleep is recommended to help relieve pain and promote healing and repair. With adequate sleep being an important part of the overall holistic bigger picture when it comes to recovering from pain and injury, here’s a look into the connection between sleep and pain, and what practical steps you can start implementing at home today to improve your sleep quality.

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In 2020, the World Health Organisation made notable updates to their exercise guidelines. These updates included increasing the recommendations for both the amount of exercise performed each week, as well as adding strength or resistance training such as push-ups or squats to the regimen. Unfortunately, under these guidelines, it was found that 85% of Australian adults and 80% of children were not meeting their exercise targets.

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